A blog post from Rekt has revealed that FTX, a leading centralized exchange, has charged one of its users around $1 million for helping him to retrieve a deposit made into a wrong address. 

FTX charged 15% instead of 5%

According to the post, the trader made a wrong deposit of $6.3 million into Paxos Stablecoin, whose ticker had been rebranded to USDP, whereas his intention was to deposit the funds into the stablecoin token for DeFi borrowing platform Unit Protocol whose ticker was also USDP.

In the defense submitted to the exchange, the trader revealed that this mistake was from the exchange because it failed to notify its users “of any other important announcements (such as coin name change) except emails of upcoming IEOs.”

He also continued that the charges being levied against him does not align with the “Wrong Address or Chain” policy of the exchange which states that the exchange would only charge between “$500 or 5%” to help a customer retrieve wrong deposits made into an FTX address. Instead, the exchange is taking around 15 percent of the funds as its charges.

The FTX support attending to the customer gave an interesting response to the customer defense which reads, “Unfortunately the decision on this matter is final. Please do not deposit assets that are not supported on your FTX addresses.”

No official response from the exchange

Rekt stated that it was able to confirm the transaction on blockchain and that it also contacted FTX for comments but it received no response. So it is calling on the exchange to “charge this user the 5% fee that (is) proposed in your terms and conditions, or explain to the community why they decided to ignore their own policy.”

Available information has shown that the claims made by this customer was posted to the official FTX subreddit but it was deleted. 

A Twitter user @Barmy also claimed to have sent the Rekt blog post to a FTX telegram group but got banned immediately too.

As of press time, the exchange was yet to release any official comment.

The post FTX charges customer $1 million for transferring to wrong address appeared first on CryptoSlate.